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Study Shows that Unreasonable Behavior Ends More Marriages than Infidelity

Posted on October 2, 2013

Warring couples are only half as likely to cite adultery as the cause of a marriage breakdown than they were 40 years ago, but claims of unreasonable behaviour have rocketed, analysis of more than 5m divorce cases has shown.

Co-operative Legal Services compared the grounds for divorce in the 70s, 80s, 90s and 2000s as well as the present day.

It found that while in the 70s, 29% of marriages ended because of adultery, the latest figures show only 15% of divorces were down to infidelity. In the 70s unreasonable behaviour was cited in 28% of cases but it now accounts for almost half of all divorces (47%).

Examples of unreasonable behaviour given to lawyers for divorce include an unsociable husband making his wife feel guilty when she wanted to go out with her friends; a cross-dressing husband who decided to have a sex change; and a spouse withdrawing all the family savings – £40,000 – and burning it in the bedroom.

Click here to continue reading this article from The Guardian.

 

Smithers, Rebecca. (2013). Adultery falls behind bad behaviour as leading grounds for divorce. TheGuardian.com. Retrieved on October 2, 2013, from http://www.theguardian.com/money/2013/sep/20/divorce-adultery-bad-behaviour.

Posted in Divorce

Tags: emotional well-being